• Pearl Jam Release a Video under the Creative Commons License

    This content was originally published on benscomputer.no-ip.org 21st May 2006

    Pearl Jam have released the Video to "Life Wasted" under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No-Derivs-License This basically means you must give the Original Authors Credit, you cannot use it for commercial gain, and you may not make derived works. Other than that you are free to copy and share it. I think it is fantastic that Pearl Jam are giving something back to the fans, this is the first major record company to release under the Creative commons, and hopefully we will see many more.

  • Protecting Identity and Copyright Online

    At times, it really feels like the world is completely fucked. We've got a US president who somehow manages to be enough of an arse to fall out with Canadians flying off to meet a nuclear armed mad-man. We seem to be witnessing the increasing rise of a foaming mouthed racist alt-right, and have long since mourned the death of quality journalism in the media. Israeli defence forces are so focused on justifying murder of unarmed civillians that they now tweet about executing people for throwing a stone.

    Yes, at times, it seems like the entire world is off to hell in a hand-cart.

    Underneath it all, though, politics doesn't seem to be that different behind the scenes. Politician are still trying to implement many of the same stupid things that we've seen raised again and again throughout our lives. 

    As fucked as the world may seem, it's important that it not act as a distraction from the issues we can do something about. Trump, for better or worse, is here to stay (at least until his KFC infested diet catches up with him).

    But we can do something about fuckwits in Government once again suggesting that implementing the ability to control and track what everyone does online is in any way a positive. We also can do something about fuckwits from many Government's who think it's beneficial for humanity for them to take a bended knee before Copyright cartels and screw the lot of us in the process (otherwise known as Article 13 of the EU Copyright Directive).

    This post isn't about the things that have become big, but about the things that will become massive infringements on our lives if allowed to pass unchallenged.

  • Republished: A note about the PRS v Youtube Dispute

    This article was originally published on benscomputer.no-ip.org in 2009

    There has been a bit in the news recently about Google's decision to remove access to Youtube hosted music from UK users. This is as a result of a breakdown of talks between the Performing Rights Society, and Google itself.

    In statements, PRS has identified the problem as arising from Google not being willing to pay more than a pittance. Google states that the dispute has arisen because of the vast jump in PRS Fees.

    The PRS has now set up a website - Fair play for creators - dedicated to pushing their message of Performers and Composers rights.

  • Republished: An Update on DRM

    This content was originally posted on benscomputer.no-ip.org in April 2006

    As many know, Digital Rights Management, or as many now call it Digital Restrictions Management is continually being forced upon us. It was in the news recently that the Blu-ray format was going to have a large capacity to restrict users rights, similarly HD-DVD will have much the same, if slightly less features. Now the Movie companies have said that most of the features will go unused most of the time, however you should keep in mind that your Blu-ray/HD-DVD player will regularly update its licensing rules, so the Disk you paid nearly £30 for may play now, but in a weeks time, even, you may find that your license to watch this is revoked for seemingly no reason.

  • Republished: Looking at the Digital Britain Report

    Originally published on Benscomputer.no-ip.org 16 June 2009

    Well, the long awaited 'Digital Britain' report is out. It's 254 pages long, and not being at the RSA I haven't had chance to have a full read through yet. I have managed to pick out a few highlights though, and although certain sections made me want to throttle whoever suggested Lord Carter was the right man, he does redeem himself in other areas.

    So lets take a look at the good and then the bad;

  • UK High Court Approves National Censorship in the name of Copyright Protection

    At the UK's High Court, Justice Arnold made a decision that is not only stupid but dangerous. In the fight between the MPA and BT he ruled that Cleanfeed should be used to block the copyright infringing site Newzbin.

    Cleanfeed is a technology designed to do one thing - prevent access to child abuse material (the effectiveness of it is another matter). But now it will also be used to block Newzbin (and you can be sure other sites will follow).

    So why is the decision so utterly stupid?